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Final Project

My project was to replicate King Tut’s mask and adapt it to today’s society. The beautiful and intricate mask of King Tut was designed in the image of the pharaoh and was intended to assist the king’s spirit in its transition to the afterlife. In addition to ensuring that the soul was able to recognize its own body, the burial mask transformed mortals to a godly state and allowed them to pass safely through the underworld. King Tut’s mask weighs about 25 pounds and stands about 2 feet tall. This priceless treasure is composed of a solid gold base inlaid with semi-precious stones such as lapis lazuli, obsidian, and quartz. The face of the mask, meant to be a likeness of King Tut, is made of a smooth, radiant gold. Ancient Egyptians associated gold with the sun god, Ra, and considered it to be a powerful material for aiding pharaohs in their journey to the afterlife. Sitting atop the pharaoh’s head is a traditional headpiece made of gold with bright blue stripes of lapis lazuli. In addition to the striking blue stripes, the headpiece features both a rearing cobra and a vulture. Known together as the “two ladies of the pharaoh”, these figures would have served a dual purpose of protecting the pharaoh from those who might oppose him and symbolize the king’s power over both Upper and Lower Egypt. Notable rings of lapis lazuli encircle the eyes of King Tut’s mask. Elaborate eye makeup was a standard for Egyptian royalty, as it created the almond eye shape which was considered desirable. One of the most notable features of King Tut’s mask is the long, narrow golden beard. False beards similar to the one on the mask would have been worn by the pharaoh as a symbol of his position as a living god and divine being. Coupled with the false beard, the crook and flail crossed over the chest would have emphasized the relationship between Osiris, lord of the underworld, and the spirit of the deceased pharaoh. Spells for protection and guidance from the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead are carved into the back and shoulders. My replication contained a few changes, such as painting King Tut a beard/moustache. The reason I did this was to make King Tut appear masculine. Yet it was kind of a failure. King Tut ended up appearing cross gendered. Which I guess can represent today’s society’s willingness to accept the LGBTQ community and further more. Being exposed to King Tuts mask as a kid always left the idea in my head that King Tut was a female. In the original mask King Tut has very feminine features. Adding a beard to my replication was my way of making it more masculine. Another reason I wanted to recreate King Tut’s mask is that when it was first created it was created with gold and very expensive jewelery that is hard to find on a day to day basis. Creating this project with just paint and paper was very interesting and it looked super close to King Tuts original mask. The art project was very fun!

Art History Bibliography

“Egyptian Art.” Khan Academy, Khan Academy, www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ap-art-history/ancient-mediterranean-ap/ancient-egypt-ap/a/egyptian-art. 

This article talks about how Egyptian art is not as naturalistic as Greek or the Renaissance art. It is more blocky, static, and strangely abstract. Egyptian art had a whole different purpose for their art. Most of Egyptian art was not intended to be seen. This art was supposed to be a personal entity of the owner. The art was supposed to provide the being to interact during the afterlife by using terrestrial objects such as the art. These arts were used to honor the dead.  Many of the art that is portrayed in the Musuem is taken from the elite and royal status. The glitz and glam follows to our idea of modern aesthetic. Yet we fail to realize that art from lower status was used for the same purpose as art for the upper status. For three-dimensional Egyptian art was aimed to produce the real world. They used different objects to give the idea of naturalism. While two-dimensional art aimed to provide the most representative aspects of each element. Registers are parallel lines that were used to separate each artistic figure from another one in a painting. Size was used to tell the hierarchy of an object. The bigger the object may be the more important they are. This article offers background information on what Egyptian art is used for and why it was even created in the first place. It is useful because it informs you that Egyptian art doesn’t have the same purpose as other art. Rather it is used for the dead to interact with the living. While creating my art piece it can help me focus more on the art rather than the glitz and glam because that wasn’t the purpose of Egyptian art. 

“Meet the Gilded Lady.” AMNH, www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/on-exhibit-posts/meet-the-gilded-lady. 

This article talks about the Gilded Lady who has been embalmed for more than 1,500 years ago. She is one of the most well-preserved mummies in the collection. Keeping mummies preserved meant limited access to see what’s in the inside of the coffin. The exterior details offered clues about the Gilded Lady. The Gilded Lady is covered with intricate linen bindings, gilded headdress, and painted facial features. The mummy dates from 30 BC–AD 395, a period when Egypt was a province of the Roman Empire. While the practice of mummification endured in Egypt, it was transformed by Roman influences. Before the Roman era, for example, mummies had been placed in wooden coffins, while the Gilded Lady is preserved in only linen wrappings and cartonnage, a papier-mâché-like material. Also absent are the hieroglyphics that decorated mummy coffins in earlier times. CT scans provided an inside look on how the mummy may look like and how it was mummified. Through the CT scans it was discovered that the mummy was approximately 40 years old and suffered from tuberculosis. She also had white lumps under her chin and skull which may be resign to keep the mummy odor free. The reason I read this article is because I found it interesting how they used CT scans to sketch out an image on how the Gilded Lady looked like. It offers my project to focus on the features from the Gilded Lady to create a realistic Egyptian person from that time frame. It’s useful because it will give the sense of realism. 

“Mummies in Egypt.” AMNH, www.amnh.org/exhibitions/mummies/mummies-in-egypt. 

This article is about mummies in Egypt. The article discusses the mummification process in Egypt. Mummification took place because it was considered a key step in a person’s journey to the afterlife. The mummification process took place by removing many of the internal organs, desiccating the body in a drying salt, and wrapping the preserved body in linen before placing it in a wooden coffin. Since grave robbing was a problem in Egypt many of the coffins were made from limestone. This made it harder for robbers to rob. Sarcophagus was used to keep the coffin and the mummy in place. Egyptians believed that organs and intestines should be preserved because they would be needed in the afterlife. The organs would be placed in canopic jars with removable top carved to represents the four sons of Horus. Egyptians believed that this protected the organs. Archaeologists also discovered multiple animals mummified. They believed that they would be used as offerings to the God’s. It offer’s my project background information on the purpose of the mummification process. It’s useful because it shows that how much Egyptians prioritize the way the mummification process was done. Although sarcophagus was used to keep the mummy in place finding that as a common product in nowadays would be a hard thing. 

 

Roehrig, Catharine H. “Egypt in the New Kingdom (ca. 1550–1070 B.C.).” In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–. http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/nking/hd_nking.htm (October 2000) 

This article is about Egypt in the New Kingdom. Theban rulers began to drive the Hyksos kings (Dynasty 15) from the Delta. This was accomplished by Ahmose I. This led to the formation of the New Kingdom. The New Kingdom Pharoahs commanded unimaginable wealth. This was spent majority on to please the God Amun- re of Thebes. Dynasty 19 established a capital near Delta but Thebes still remained a cultural and art center. The Pharoahs built their temples in Thebes where they had a lot of religious texts. At the site of Dier-El Medina a lot of artistic artifacts are stored. This article offers my project information on where I can find the most creative art pieces in Egyptian time which would be The New Kingdom. This is useful because instead of wasting hours on trying to pick an art piece to focus/recreate I can pick and art piece from the New Kingdom because that was one of the things that the New Kingdom is known for. 

 

“Tutankhamun’s Tomb (Innermost Coffin and Death Mask).” Khan Academy, Khan Academy, www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ap-art-history/ancient-mediterranean-ap/ancient-egypt-ap/a/tutankhamuns-tomb. 

Tutankhamun’s tomb would be lost to history if it wasn’t discovered by the archaeologist Howard Carter in the Valley of the Kings.  By finding Tutankhamun’s tomb it gave us an insight on how the New Kingdom was performing. Tutankhamun’s father turned the religious attention of the kingdom to the worship of the god Aten, the sun disc. While Tutankhamen shifted the focus of the country’s worship back to the god Am. Tutankhamen died at the age of 18 but his death is unknown. When Howard Carter discovered Tutankhamen tomb’s he was welcomed with strange animals, gold, and statues. Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus (a box-like stone container) held not one but three coffins in which to hold the body of the king. The outer two coffins were crafted in wood and covered in gold along with many semiprecious stones, such as lapis lazuli and turquoise. The inner coffin, however, was made of solid gold. The image of the Pharoah is shown in his divine form in the after-life. The goddesses Nekhbet (vulture) and Wadjet (cobra), inlaid with semiprecious stones, stretch their wings across his torso. Beneath these goddesses are two more—Isis and Nephthys—etched into the gold lid.  Tutankhamen’s death mask is one of masterpieces of Egyptian art. This death mask is rested on top of the body. It is in the innermost coffin which is filled with gold. ). Tutankhamen is depicted wearing the striped nemes headdress (the striped head-cloth typically worn by pharaohs in ancient Egypt) with the goddesses Nekhbet and Wadjet depicted again protecting his brow. He also wears a false beard that further connects him to the image of a god as with the inner coffin. He wears a broad collar, which ends in terminals shaped as falcon heads. The back of the mask is covered with Spell 151b from the Book of the Dead, which the Egyptians used as a road map for the afterlife.  This particular spell protects the various limbs of Tutankhamun as he moves into the underworld. This is useful to my project because I was planning on creating the Tutankhamun’s mask. Although I cannot create it with real gold and expensive stones, I will try my best. As a kid whenever I looked at this mask it seemed way more feminine to me than masculine. Using the image provided on the website I will try to use the Tutankhamun’s mask image to create a more modern masculine version.

Outline Background Art History

The theme for my artwork is Egyptian Art. I would like to take inspiration from the following art pieces and create my own artwork with a twist with the modern era artwork. A lot of Egyptian art has been created a very long time ago. Some of these pieces are made out of things that are not accessible to a student. So to create Egyptian art work using common things that are found will be a take on my Egyptian art. These art piece relate to my artwork because based off of these pieces I will recreating my artwork. These pieces of artwork is suppose to lead me to the road of creating “authentic ” Egyptian art.  These pieces of art work highlight very small details which distincts Egyptian art work from other artworks. Such as most of Egyptian statues or paintings that consisted of people have really voluminous lips, cat eyes, and a thin nose that gets bigger at the end. Egyptian art work also has hieroglyphics and vibrant colors to make the art work stand out. Also, it is somewhat hard to tell the difference between a man and a woman when it comes to Egyptian art. When I will create my art piece I will make it very noticeable if the artwork is a man or women. Shabty of Sati. Egypt Saqqara. New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, circa1390-1352 B.C.E. Brooklyn Museum, Charle Edwin Wilbour Fund 

Mummy Mask

Period: Roman Period Date: A.D. 60–70 Geography: From Egypt; Possibly from Middle Egypt, Meir Medium: Cartonnage, plaster, paint, plant fibers Dimensions: l. 63 cm (24 13/16 in); w. 33 cm (13 in); h. 53 (20 7/8 in) Credit Line: Rogers Fund, 1919 Accession Number: 19.2. Met Museum

Figure of Isis- Aphrodite , Met Museum

Period:Roman Period ,Date:2nd century A.D. Geography:From Egypt, Medium:Terracotta painted brown, black, red, and pink on white engobe Dimensions:h. 49.5 cm (19 1/2 in); w. 12.5 cm (4 15/16 in) Credit Line:Purchase, Lila Acheson Wallace Gift, 1991 Accession Number:1991.76

Brooklyn Museum,  Cartonnage of Nespanetjerenpere.Egypt, probably from Thebes. Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund

Brooklyn Museum, Coffin and Mummy Board of Pa- seba-khai-en-iept. Egypt, From Thebes, Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund

Met Visit

Visiting The Met is probably one of the most visually pleasing things you can do! The Met is huge and it features a bunch of different exhibitions such as “Art of Native America,” “Dangerous Beauty: Medusa in Classical Art,” last but not least, “Japanese Arms and Armor from the collection of Estuko and John Morris.” My favorite part of the museum was the “Dress to Impress” collection. It consisted of so many beautiful and elegant outfits. The colors and the patterns on the outfit were absolutely vivid. You can really tell someone took their time to create these pieces. On the outfits there was detailing on the collar which made it seem like it was handmade. At the Met I looked at some renaissance and baroque pieces of art. The art piece from the renaissance collection that piqued my interest is a footed beaker.  Although it looks like a vase it’s called a beaker. The cultural background that it is imported from is Hungarian, Nagyzeben. The art piece is a medium size art piece (Height: 9 13/16 in. (24.9 cm) that is silver and partially gilded. The art work is made out of metalwork- silver.  The art work itself looks like its dripping in gold. It has a really cool semi silver finish which contrasts against the gold designs. There is a thick band at the bottom which creates an illusion of two pieces rather than one whole piece.  The Baroque artwork that I picked is a footed beaker with a cover. It was easier to compare two pieces of artwork which were similar in shape and design. It’s originated from Hungarian, Brasso. The artwork is a medium (15 3/4 x 6 11/16 in. (40 x 17 cm) size of gilded-silver, metal-work. The art piece had a dull gold and silver finish to it. This art work has a man in the middle with flowers/leaves around the art piece. The art piece also has a cover to this beaker. The cover has a very shiny finish to give an illusion that it is glistening.  The difference between Renaissance and Baroque art is that most people understand that if a painting or sculpture is made in Europe between 1300 and 1600, it’s likely a Renaissance work. And, if it’s a European work made between 1600 and 1750, then it’s Baroque. … A good word for Renaissance art is “stabilize,” while a good one for the Baroque is “dramatize.”

Unit 2 Summary

Throughout  this unit we have learned about different cultures and expressions of art.  In ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia art was formed to show the gods and kings how much the common civilians worships them. Through the art you can see the different socioeconomic status’s of the common civilian. Such as the common civilian would seem to be smaller compared to the king/god. The statues that the common civilian would put out to take place for their worship would have extremely huge eyes which would make it seem like it is not a humane thing to have. In contrast artwork in Ancient Greece put an emphasis on humanism. Greek art is portrayed to capture the movements and realism of humans.

Unit 2 started off with a trip to the Brooklyn Museum has many collections that one can view. These collections consist of Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power, Syria, Then and Now: Stories from Refugees a Century Apart, One: Do Ho Suh, Half the Picture: A Feminist Look at the Collection, Something to Say: Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine, Deborah Kass, Kameelah Janan Rasheed, and Hank Willis Thomas, Cecilia Vicuña: Disappeared Quipu,Rob Wynne: FLOAT, Infinite Blue, The Brooklyn Della Robbia, Arts of Korea, American Art, A Woman’s Afterlife: Gender Transformation in Ancient Egypt, European Art,Ancient Egyptian Art, Assyrian Art, The Dinner Party by Judy Chicago, Decorative Arts and Period Rooms, Visible Storage ▪ Study Center, Life, Death, and Transformation in the Americas, Williamsburg Murals: A Rediscovery and Steinberg Family Sculpture Garden. The collection that piqued my interest the most is Arts of Korea.

The Pair of Boy Attendants, Korea Joseon Dynasty is an art piece that stood out to me. This art piece The Pair of Boy Attendants, Korea Joseon Dynasty has soft lines, bright colors, and is a three dimensional statue.  The Pair of Boy Attendants, Korea Joseon Dynasty are usually called dongjas. These dongjas would be placed at buddist sculpture dieties to show that the donjgas are bringing gifts. While one of the boys is carrying a turtle the other boy is assumed to be carrying a tray of food. The colors primarily used in the sculptures are very light although if you look at the head and the feet they are a dark color. This contrasts with the white skin. The clothing on the statue is very detailed. When you look on the sleeve you can see the creases of the top, which makes it seem like that the shirt was a little too long or baggy. On the statue it’s very hard to see the turtle. It seems to blend in with the boys top. While the other boys tray does not blend in with his top that significantly it is the same color as the boys top. Both of the boys have very straight lines on their hands where you can see their fingers. The two boys have very faint curved eyebrow lines and ruby red lips which contrasts against their pale skin.

We then continued the unit with humanism in Greek and Roman art. Humanism is an ideology that believes values and needs are more important then religious beliefs. Humans are suppose to ignore their needs and desires and work on creating their own set of ethics. Humanism emphasized on what the human was capable of. Humanism in Greek and Roman art were portrayed through creating a central focus on human art. Throughout Greek and Roman art work the ideologies of the Renaissance were portrayed in every aspect. The Renaissance was a period where there was emphasize on classical learning, human potential , and achievements. When looking at Greek and Roman art they seem to be stuck in a moment. This means that there is so much detail in the art of the Greek and Roman that it seems like they or on pause and you can figure out exactly what their purpose is and motive is. Greek and Roman art was usually portrayed in nudity which showed the confidence they had with their bodies. In contrast, humanism in Mesopotamian art and Egyptian art were used for the worship of kings and gods. Although they would have human like features their would be emphasis on the bulging eyes to let the kings and gods know that how devoted they were to them. Their art work was usually covered in clothing and loins to glorify their modesty, since nudity was frowned upon. While art in Ancient Greek and Rome was used to glorify the athleticism and sports whereas in Mesopotamian art and Egyptian art were used to devote their attention to religion.

Anubis an art piece that I very much enjoyed is from Egyptian art that has a head of of a jackal and the body of a man and is the god of the dead. Anubis weighs your heart to a feather. This is to see if your sins weigh more or less than a feather. The whole aspect of sinning comes from religion. That we please god by NOT sinning. Mesopotamian and Egyptian Art also show the hierarchy and the social status with the pharaoh shown to be the biggest and on the top while accompanied by his followers who are of similar or smaller size and the slaves which are the smallest and the lowest.

Through this summary we learned about the different cultures and how they portray their art. Either through the mixture of animal like features or the captivity of the human body.

Humanism in Greek and Roman Art

Humanism is an ideology that believes values and needs are more important then religious beliefs. Humans are suppose to ignore their needs and desires and work on creating their own set of ethics. Humanism emphasized on what the human was capable of. Humanism in Greek and Roman art were portrayed through creating a central focus on human art. Throughout Greek and Roman art work the ideologies of the Renaissance were portrayed in every aspect. The Renaissance was a period where there was emphasize on classical learning, human potential , and achievements. When looking at Greek and Roman art they seem to be stuck in a moment. This means that there is so much detail in the art of the Greek and Roman that it seems like they or on pause and you can figure out exactly what their purpose is and motive is. Greek and Roman art was usually portrayed in nudity which showed the confidence they had with their bodies. In contrast, humanism in Mesopotamian art and Egyptian art were used for the worship of kings and gods. Although they would have human like features their would be emphasis on the bulging eyes to let the kings and gods know that how devoted they were to them. Their art work was usually covered in clothing and loins to glorify their modesty, since nudity was frowned upon. While art in Ancient Greek and Rome was used to glorify the athleticism and sports whereas in Mesopotamian art and Egyptian art were used to devote their attention to religion.

Kroisos from Anavysos is an art piece that is very detail orientated. Although it is a statue of a man you can clearly see the details that portray the elements of  humanism.  While looking at this statue you can see the toes, fingers, hair, eyes , nose, expression and posture. This statue seems to be in a completely natural state Where it shows that this statue was not for a religious purpose it was just an actual person who was more than likely modeling for the artist.

Anubis an art piece from Egyptian art that has a head of of a jackal and the body of a man and is the god of the dead. Anubis weighs your heart to a feather. This is to see if your sins weigh more or less than a feather. The whole aspect of sinning comes from religion. That we please god by NOT sinning. Mesopotamian and Egyptian Art also show the hierarchy and the social status with the pharaoh shown to be the biggest and on the top while accompanied by his followers who are of similar or smaller size and the slaves which are the smallest and the lowest.

 

Brooklyn Museum

The Brooklyn Museum has many collections that one can view. These collections consist of Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power, Syria, Then and Now: Stories from Refugees a Century Apart, One: Do Ho Suh, Half the Picture: A Feminist Look at the Collection, Something to Say: Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine, Deborah Kass, Kameelah Janan Rasheed, and Hank Willis Thomas, Cecilia Vicuña: Disappeared Quipu,Rob Wynne: FLOAT, Infinite Blue, The Brooklyn Della Robbia, Arts of Korea, American Art, A Woman’s Afterlife: Gender Transformation in Ancient Egypt, European Art,Ancient Egyptian Art, Assyrian Art, The Dinner Party by Judy Chicago, Decorative Arts and Period Rooms, Visible Storage ▪ Study Center, Life, Death, and Transformation in the Americas, Williamsburg Murals: A Rediscovery and Steinberg Family Sculpture Garden. The collection that piqued my interest the most is Arts of Korea.  

The Pair of Boy Attendants, Korea Joseon Dynasty is an art piece that stood out to me. This art piece The Pair of Boy Attendants, Korea Joseon Dynasty has soft lines, bright colors, and is a three dimensional statue.  The Pair of Boy Attendants, Korea Joseon Dynasty are usually called dongjas. These dongjas would be placed at buddist sculpture dieties to show that the donjgas are bringing gifts. While one of the boys is carrying a turtle the other boy is assumed to be carrying a tray of food. The colors primarily used in the sculptures are very light although if you look at the head and the feet they are a dark color. This contrasts with the white skin. The clothing on the statue is very detailed. When you look on the sleeve you can see the creases of the top, which makes it seem like that the shirt was a little too long or baggy. On the statue it’s very hard to see the turtle. It seems to blend in with the boys top. While the other boys tray does not blend in with his top that significantly it is the same color as the boys top. Both of the boys have very straight lines on their hands where you can see their fingers. The two boys have very faint curved eyebrow lines and ruby red lips which contrasts against their pale skin. 

In the collection Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power the art piece that captured my attention the most is “The Liberation of Aunt Jemima.” The reason that this art piece captured my attention is that when you closely look in the back there is Aunt Jemima who is the cover on nowadays pancake syrup. The painting consists of warm earthy tones in which each element of color varies and contrasts with each other. The woman with the very dark hues is shown bigger than everyone else.  In contrast to the big size the woman around her apron has a post card which shows a black lady holding a white baby. These colors contrast each other which makes the baby stand out. Jemima on one hand is holding a broom and on the other she’s holding a rifle. There are no soft lines in this painting rather it seems like the piece is just blobbed there.  The floor is white which brings out the earthy tones in the painting.  The larger Aunt Jemima has round eyes that are bulging out of her head while the red lip goes with the red dress.  

 

Art History Summary Unit 1

During this unit we learned about formal analysis, banking model, power and pedagogy. During this unit formal analysis was majority of what this unit emphasized on.  Formal Analysis is when you visually describe the element in a work of art. When writing a formal analysis for a piece of work it is best to decipher the piece of art. Having background information such as the time of place the piece was made in can a give a historical insight. While analyzing the painting try to ask yourself who is the center of the piece? Is the artist trying to focus on one person/object or is it a bunch of things that the artist wants you to focus on? This is called the CENTRAL FOCUS. Although you may not have answers asking a bunch of questions that will help you understand the piece of art and will help your imagination run wild. Evaluate the art work. What is this art work? While analyzing the work of art always keep in mind to SHOW not tell. Show the class where exactly are there soft lines or where in the art there are structured lines. By doing this your formal analysis will consist of depth.We learned throughout the unit in order to understand truly what’s occurring in the piece of work we first have to find out what is the central focus of the art work. Once that is figured out we then look at formal properties. Formal properties consist of contrast, size/scale, composition (is it chalk work? oil painting? water colors?) position, material, and illusionism (how “realistic” (mimesis) does an art work look, line, and color). The second part of a formal analysis is finding the answers to the questions you have asked earlier. Where does this take place? Who was the painting made for? Was it a commissioned painting?  What is the message of the painting? Answering and including all of this in your formal analysis will help you understand the elements of the art work and how the art work came to be. Understanding formal analysis helped us analyze the art piece  “Venus of Urbino.” The Venus of Urbino is an oil painting by the Italian painter Titian this piece consisted of saturated tones.  In class we discussed how the female’s body had soft lines and how the dog and the female’s body consisted of the same tones.  While in the background of the painting there are straight columns, which contrasts with the soft lines. When we continued to the next topic in the unit we learned that the banking model is the form of teaching where teachers have minimal communication with students when teaching a lesson.  Instead of communicating, teachers would often lecture and “deposit” information into the student’s head. This would happen through memorizing, repeating, and reciting.  Freire explained that this method of teaching is flawed because students are not taught how to process information which, leads them to not fully understand what they are learning. This empowers the teacher and disempowers the student.  Each student learns in a different and unique way which The Banking Model eradicates. Students who are not able to process what the teacher taught using The Banking Model were often lost and left behind in the education system because of the authority the teacher held over the student. To me this personally is the worst type of teaching. Being a visual learner it is very hard to grasp information when its all in a lecture form.

 

Blog Post 4: Formal Analysis

Formal Analysis is when you visually describe the element in a work of art. When writing a formal analysis for a piece of work it is best to decipher the piece of art. Having background information such as the time of place the piece was made in can a give a historical insight. While analyzing the painting try to ask yourself who is the center of the piece? Is the artist trying to focus on one person/object or is it a bunch of things that the artist wants you to focus on? This is called the CENTRAL FOCUS. Although you may not have answers asking a bunch of questions that will help you understand the piece of art and will help your imagination run wild. Evaluate the art work. What is this art work? While analyzing the work of art always keep in mind to SHOW not tell. Show the class where exactly are there soft lines or where in the art there are structured lines. By doing this your formal analysis will consist of depth.

In order to understand truly whats occurring in the piece of work we first have to find out what is the central focus of the art work. Once that is figured out we then look at formal properties. Formal properties consist of contrast, size/scale, composition (is it chalk work? oil painting? water colors?) position, material, and illusionism (how “realistic” (mimesis) does an art work look, line, and color). The second part of a formal analysis is finding the answers to the questions you have asked earlier. Where does this take place? Who was the painting made for? Was it a commissioned painting?  What is the message of the painting? Answering and including all of this in your formal analysis will help you understand the elements of the art work and how the art work came to be.

Blog Post 3: Pedagogy and Power

Paulo Freire was born September, 19, 1921. Freire was raised in Northeast Brazil and is best known for his work “Pedagogy and Oppressed.” Most of his work is stemmed from experiences of his childhood. Since Freire lived among the poor he understood how class consciousness and knowledge played a role simultaneously.  Freire became a grammar school teacher in high school and continued to get multiple degrees in his lifetime. In 1946 Paulo Freire became the Director of the Department of Education and Social Services.

In the text Paulo Freire introduces the topic Banking Model. Banking Model is the form of teaching where teachers have minimal communication with students when teaching a lesson.  Instead of communicating, teachers would often lecture and “deposit” information into the student’s head. This would happen through memorizing, repeating, and reciting.  Freire explained that this method of teaching is flawed because students are not taught how to process information which, leads them to not fully understand what they are learning. This empowers the teacher and disempowers the student.  Each student learns in a different and unique way which The Banking Model eradicates. Students who are not able to process what the teacher taught using The Banking Model were often lost and left behind in the education system because of the authority the teacher held over the student.

As a student who is  a visual learner being taught using The Banking Model would be a big NO NO!!!!!! There are often times where teachers and professors have this authority over us that we cannot really control the way that they are teaching. Professors and teachers who do not acknowledge that there are different types of way to teach rather then lecturing just make it super hard on students to engage in class. Being lectured at is not fun and usually puts me to sleep and I am pretty sure other college students would agree with me. Professors should think how can I teach in a way that students would learn and understand the information being taught. Anyone can sit there and lecture at students but how many professors/ teachers can actually say that they have made their classes engaging and actually HAVE TAUGHT?!?!